PA PA PAA: Teach About Fairtrade and Cocoa Comic relief KS2, KS3

Change: fair measures

What does your school think of Fairtrade? Turn a survey into a Fairtrade action plan

Planning the lesson

beans-Dave-SnyderThis lesson involves carrying out a survey to measure what students think about Fairtrade, chocolate and their power as consumers, and developing a Fairtrade action plan from the results.

If you intend to carry out a whole school survey, ask for your headteacher’s backing first. Decide how your students can carry out their survey without disruption to lessons. Should they interview face-to-face at lunchtime or break? Would it be more effective to ask other class teachers to give class time to the survey? In which case, they will need printed copies for their students. Decide how to collect and collate the surveys.

Starter

(10 minutes)

If students have done lesson 1A Who eats what?, remind them that they have already carried out a simple survey to find out about their chocolate eating habits. Explain that now they are going to complete a bigger survey, which was produced by Comic Relief to see what young people really think about Fairtrade, chocolate and their power as consumers.

They will then plan how they might use the survey results to influence the purchase or sale of more Fairtrade products to help poor farmers in Ghana and other developing countries to improve their lives. (back to top)

Main activity

(50 minutes)

Individual 

The students should complete the survey on their own, answering the questions in order, or you could take the class through the questions one by one, giving them time to fill in their answers.

Group work 

Divide the class into groups of five and ask each group to decide which questions are the most important to them and which are likely to be the most useful in influencing others to sell or buy Fairtrade. Once they have decided they should tally up the answers to these questions.

Give each group a sheet of A2 paper and ask them to clearly record their chosen questions and results and then display their sheet.

Each group could also be allocated a set of questions and analyse the responses, e.g. one group could work on the Fairtrade section, another group on the chocolate eating habits section, and so on.

Whole class 

Are there any significant and obvious differences between the various groups’ choices? Can you now collate the chosen questions and answers to provide a picture for the whole class?

Do students think that if they surveyed the whole school the answers would be very different? Why not find out?

Use the students’ chosen questions to develop a school survey and to help students campaign for Fairtrade in schools. For more ideas, including a petition, see lesson 6C Stock the choc.

Follow-up

When the results are in students can:

  • use the information to design graphs, charts and diagrams
  • interpret the results and draw out the main conclusions
  • carry out the survey on different sections of the community – teachers, parents and students
  • read and discuss Printout: Fair measures action plan, which offers a range of ideas on how to promote Fairtrade at school.

Is the school ready to campaign for Fairtrade in school? Or should you do some awareness-raising first? Or both? Move either to debate (see lesson 6B) or campaigning (see lesson 6C). (back to top)